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Blackberry App World – Demonstration

technobuffalo: technobuffalo.com Follow me on twitter: cuthut.com To Download Blackberry App World: na.blackberry.com Giving a demo of the new Blackberry App World Thanks for watching, Jon

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Get Your Game On With Sony’s Xperia Play Android Phone

Posted by admin | Posted in Gadget Reviews | Posted on 29-05-2011

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Where most slider phones have a keyboard, Sony Ericsson’s Xperia Play sports Playstation controls. Photo: Jon Snyder/Wired.com.

Mothers, lock up your gamers. The PlayStation phone has arrived.

And while it’s a bit on the chubby side, we think that, for Sony Ericsson’s Xperia Play, big is beautiful.

You could almost call the Xperia Play the shorter, fatter cousin to the svelte Xperia Arc, which Sony Ericsson once described as the “world’s thinnest smartphone.” At .62 inches, the Play looks positively bulky compared to its Xperia-line relatives — a veritable Jan Brady to the Arc’s Marcia.

But Sony Ericsson had to make some trade-offs in size in order for the slide-out frame to hide the PlayStation controller underneath. If you’re a gamer, it’s worth it. We felt right at home with the familiar PlayStation controller configuration — D-pad on the left, with the square, circle, triangle and X buttons on the right.

And unlike other, flimsier slider phones, the plastic hardware isn’t chintzy. The Play still feels sturdy in hand, even in its open position, and most likely won’t break under the pressure of an excited gamer’s grip.

Instead of the centered joysticks found on a PS3 controller, two pressure-sensitive touchpads take their place. So rather than hog up precious screen real estate steering with your fingers on games that require touch-sensitive direction, you can use the two physical touchpads. It’s a nifty concept, and fairly well-executed. The games I played that utilize the pads were decent enough in reaction time, though I found the sensitivity a bit wanting.

The phone comes bundled with seven games, though only one was exclusive to the Play: Crash Bandicoot. It’s a PS One classic, and I was psyched to see it on the roster. But if I’m buying the long-awaited PlayStation phone, I want it to be running PlayStation games. Plural.

When I asked if Sony Ericsson would continue publishing PlayStation classics to the Xperia Play, the answer was cagey, though promising: “It’s the first step we’re taking down this path.” I’ve got my fingers crossed for a Twisted Metal port by the end of the year.

I actually enjoyed the experience of gaming on the Play. For the first time, I didn’t feel like I was playing a game slapped onto a phone interface. It feels like a standalone portable gaming device. That’s no easy feat to accomplish.

Polygons rendered beautifully on the Play’s 4-inch capacitive touch screen, which was plenty big enough to view the games we played. I did wonder if I’d be wanting more screen surface area while playing a first-person shooter like Call of Duty (or if we really wanted to get old school, Doom) — but since those games aren’t available for the Xperia Play, it’s a moot point for now.

You might think the Play is underpowered, given that its processor is a single-core, 1-GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon chip, not the dual-core Nvidia Tegra 2 processor found in many recent smartphone and tablet offerings. But that’s not the case: the Play ran games and rendered menu screens like a charm. We didn’t experience any noticeable lag while gaming, nor while running Google’s proprietary smartphone apps like Gmail or Calendar.

Oh, and did we mention that the Xperia Play is also an Android phone? Because it is, and not a shabby one at that. Over the five days we spent with the phone, Verizon’s network coverage was ample. From Seattle to San Francisco, we didn’t experience any dropped calls or have much of a problem finding a signal. One big bummer, however: The phone uses Verizon’s 3G network, not the newer, faster 4G network.

Like many other smartphones, it’s got two cameras — VGA on the front as well as a 5-megapixel back-facing brother — but they’re not the greatest. The few shots I took looked washed out, a bit grainier than I would have liked. But as far as camera phones go, they’ll get the job done.

But let’s be honest. Cameras aren’t the reason you’re buying this phone. It’s a gamer’s toy, and bells and whistles like front-facing cameras should be judged with that in mind.

Our verdict after a week with the Play?

Game on.

Wired: Unskinned version of Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) makes us happy. Sturdy hardware stands up to a frustrated gamer’s kung-fu grip.

Tired: Lacks 720p video recording capability, now a standard in smartphone releases. Wireless data is slower 3G standard, not 4G. Only one PlayStation title available at launch.

Comcast Test May Lead to TV Programming Delivered Via Laptop or Video Game Console

Posted by admin | Posted in Cell Phones & Plans | Posted on 04-05-2011

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ComcastComcast is testing a system that would let users replace their set-top box with any Internet-ready device, like a laptop or video game console.

This isn’t the same tech that lets you watch live TV on your laptop, or use your iPad as a program guide. Instead, it uses the Comcast broadband network to deliver a signal to your television via VoIP.

This adds flexibility and, potentially, mobility to cable, which has been hamstrung to date by its need for co-axial cable and a set-top box.

Comcast will use MIT as a testbed for the VoIP delivery system, starting this fall, The Wall Street Journal reported today.

The move is significant for a couple of reasons.

First, as Journal reporter Jessica Vascellaro notes, VoIP is the same technology that AT&T’s U-Verse and various smaller companies have used to make an end run around pay-TV providers. In other words, Comcast proposes to beat competitors at their own packet-switched game.

Second, although Comcast says it has no plans to offer the service in geographic areas where it is not currently the cable TV provider, using VoIP would make it technically possible. If this happens, Time Warner, Cablevision and other competitors could kiss their monopoly goodbye.

Third, it reflects what most TV fans seem to prefer, which is to watch TV in the time-honored place: On the couch, in front of the biggest tube we can afford.

That preference apparently extends beyond live TV to on-demand choices. Comcast said today that its Xfinity On Demand service serves up 350 million VOD programs a month from 25,000 “entertainment choices” (TV series, movies, sports and music).

Dan Frommer at Business Insider says that works out to about 8 hours 45 minutes of VOD per month, compared to Nielsen’s March numbers for streaming Netflix users (almost 10 hours per month) and Hulu (5 hours 15 minutes per month). “And all of these are still peanuts compared to the more than 150 hours of TV that the average American watches per month,” Frommer adds.

Unlike Netflix and Hulu, Comcast’s on-demand programming doesn’t cost anything extra. It’s bundled free with a monthly cable subscription.

Nokia N-gage Tri-band GSM Game Console Phone (Unlocked

Posted by admin | Posted in Symbian | Posted on 19-04-2010

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  • Nokia N-Gage Tri-band GSM Game Console Phone (Unlocked

Product Description
Description:

2G Network GSM 900 / 1800 / 1900

Size
Dimensions 134 x 70 x 20 mm, 139 cc
Weight 137 g

Display
Type TFT, 4096 colors
Size 176 x 208 pixels, 2.1 inches, 35 x 41 mm
- Five-way directional controller

Sound
Alert types Vibration; polyphonic, monophonic, WAV, MP3 ringtones, composer
Speakerphone Yes
- Stereo line-in
- Hi-fi stereo headset

Memory
Phonebook Practically unlimited entries, 8 fields, Photocall
Call records Detailed, max 30 days
Internal … More >>

Nokia N-gage Tri-band GSM Game Console Phone (Unlocked

Sony Ericsson’s Xtrakt Game For Newer HTC Windows Phones

Posted by admin | Posted in Cell Phones & Plans | Posted on 05-02-2010

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This is an extracted game that supports never graphics drivers on HTC devices. The game is free and may be picked up by going to pocketnow.com.